Online Courses

Fall 2021 Courses (in progress)

Black Radical Pre-AlgebraMon & Wed, 8:45 AM – 9:45 AM ETAugust 16 – December 8
Black Radical Algebra IMon & Wed, 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM ETAugust 16 – December 8
Black Radical GeometryTues & Thurs, 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM ETAugust 17 – December 9
Black Radical Algebra IITues & Thurs, 11:15 AM – 12:15 PM ETAugust 17 – December 9
Homework HelpTues & Thurs, 12:30 PM – 1:30 PM ETAugust 17 – December 9

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Mathematics
Science
Technology & Engineering
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Fall 2021 Courses

Mathematics

This 16-week course in Pre-Algebra is the first semester of our full academic year course. 

Pre-Algebra is a pivotal course in a student’s mathematics career. In fact, this is where the founder of NKALA Education was held back! In Pre-Algebra we consolidate concepts learned from previous years’ math courses and we prepare students for math courses named by subject (algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus) rather than by grade-level. We use African proverbs and oral narratives along with games and some mental elbow grease to ensure that students are rooted in the African worldview as they explore this one of many mathematics subjects that was created by our African ancestors.  

The course may be taken live or on-demand at your own pace, and on your own schedule. The course features an online forum for peer learning and support; additionally each session is recorded for unlimited student review. Connect online with live streaming audio (VOIP) and video with your classmates from around the world!

Mondays & Wednesdays, 8:45 – 9:45 AM ET
Thursday HW Help, 12:30-1:30 PM ET

$390

Course Outline, Prerequisites, & Required Materials

Register here

NKALA Course Calendar

FAQs

This 16-week course in Algebra I is the first semester of our full academic year course. 

Algebra goes back to the Nile Valley of ancient Africa where our Black ancestors developed one of the earliest mathematical texts – the Iahmesu (Ahmes) Mathematical Papyrus. This ancient text (actually a copy of an even older text) contains problems from arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. The title of papyrus was “Rules for Conducting Research into Nature for the Purpose of Knowing All that Exists: Each Mystery and Each Secret.” It is in that spirit that we’re embarking upon this journey into solving for the unknown. We use African proverbs and oral narratives along with games and some mental elbow grease to ensure that students are rooted in the African worldview as they explore this one of many mathematics subjects that was created by our African ancestors. 

The course may be taken live or on-demand at your own pace, and on your own schedule. The course features an online forum for peer learning and support; additionally each session is recorded for unlimited student review. Connect online with live streaming audio (VOIP) and video with your classmates from around the world!

Mondays & Wednesdays, 10 – 11 AM ET
Thursday HW Help, 12:30-1:30 PM ET

$390

Course Outline, Prerequisites, and Required Materials

Register here

NKALA Course Calendar

FAQs

This 16-week course in Geometry is the first semester of our full academic year course. 

Across the continent of Africa we find textiles, hairstyles, and village layouts arranged with geometric fractal recursion. The Dogon were able to accurately describe the elliptical-shaped orbit of stars light-years away from the Earth. The pyramids of the Nile Valley were used to conduct land surveying and astronomical observations that led to the development of the most complete and accurate world maps of that time. The Greeks were so impressed and enamored by the efforts of these Africans that they named a mathematics discipline in their honor. Geometry is from the Greek “geo” – Earth and “metry” – measurement and was thus named in honor of the ancient African discipline of using mathematics to literally measure our planet. What we today know as geometry was known by its African creators as “Correct Methods for Conducting Research into Nature.” 

In this first semester of two, we’ll explore these correct methods. The course may be taken live or on-demand at your own pace, and on your own schedule. The course features an online forum for peer learning and support; additionally each session is recorded for unlimited student review. Connect online with live streaming audio (VOIP) and video with your classmates from around the world!

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 10 – 11 AM ET  
Thursday HW Help, 12:30-1:30 PM ET

$390

Course Outline, Prerequisites, & Required Materials

Register here

FAQs

This 16-week course in Algebra II is the first semester of our full academic year course.

Algebra II builds upon the foundation laid in Algebra I. In Algebra II we learn how to work with more complex functions such as polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. These are the functions that scientists and engineers use to build mathematical models of our natural world. We’ll explore mathematical theory dealing with relations and functions and how they intersect with matrices, sequences and series as well as probability and statistics.

Did you know…

  • −that your family ancestor tree represents a geometric sequence with a common ratio of 2?
  • −or that the formula for calculating a geometric series can be used to make an argument for reparations based on the multiplier effect of economics?
  • −how about that transcendental numbers such as e (the base of the natural logarithm) are represented in African cosmological symbols?
  • −that the geometric constant that we call π (the Greek letter “pi”) was embedded in African architecture thousands of years before the Greek alphabet was formulated?
  • −that natural processes, such as the hydraulics of a flowing river, may be modeled using algebraic equations?

Black Radical Algebra II is the initiation into the mysteries behind these and other topics underlying the mathematical world around us.

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11:15 AM – 12:15 PM ET  
Thursday HW Help, 12:30-1:30 PM ET

$390

Course Outline, Prerequisites, & Required Materials

Register here

FAQs

 

Coming Soon...

Engineering

“We are not engaged in domestic politics, in church building or in social uplift work, but we are engaged in nation building.” 

~Marcus Mosiah Garvey

Engineering is the use of science and mathematics to design and build the technologies and infrastructure that are necessary for nations to function. Engineers are nation builders; however, that connection is often not well understood. In this 8-week course we’ll explore the why and how of engineering – how engineers build technologies and infrastructure and why engineers are necessary for nation building and management activities.

In the second half of the course (spring 2021) we’ll build on these concepts and students will apply them towards their own engineering design project. Students will have to create an engineering solution to a problem, manage the budget for the project, and effectively communicate with the Client.

The course may be taken live or on-demand at your own pace, and on your own schedule. The course features an online forum for peer learning and support; additionally each session is recorded for unlimited student review. Connect online with live streaming audio (VOIP) and video with your classmates from around the world!

Coming soon…

 

This 10-week course is the follow-up to our Foundations of Engineering for Nation Building course. Students will take concepts from the previous course and apply them towards their own design project. Students will have to create an engineering solution to a problem, manage the budget for the project, and effectively communicate with the Client. The fall 2020 foundations course is a prerequisite for this design project.

The project will encompass three major areas of engineering projects – technical design, project management, and client service management. Students will choose a project among one of a select number of engineering disciplines.

In this scenario-based course, students have been hired by the Client – a Pan-African collective that operates an eco-village in a remote part of Central Africa – as engineering consultants to solve a design problem relating to one of the disciplines listed above. 

Students will have to create an engineering solution to the problem, manage the budget for the project, and effectively communicate with the Client. 

The coursework will be differentiated depending on the skill-level of each student. At a minimum students must be comfortable with reading comprehension and adept at learning and using various computer software programs.

The course features an online forum for peer learning and support; additionally each session is recorded for unlimited student review. Connect online with live streaming audio (VOIP) and video with your classmates from around the world!

Coming soon…

 

Science

Many traditional African communities up to this day use an old method for cooking. Their “kitchen” is located outdoors and their stovetop is a large pot supported by three large firestones. The Bakôngo of Central Africa call these three stones makuku matatu. These three firestones, literally and figuratively, hold up our fire. Symbolism associated with the three firestones can be found throughout the Continent, usually centering around ideas of the three major stages of human (physical) life. 

It is with this paradigm that we embark upon this second 16-week semester (a continuation of the fall 2020 semester) exploration into the science of the physical world. We’ll examine introductory concepts in physics and chemistry through African proverbs, cosmological principles, and oral narratives. Connect online with live streaming audio (VOIP) and video with your classmates from around the world!

Coming Soon…

 

Futu dia n’kisi diakânga Kalûnga mu diâmbu dia môyo. A sachet of medicines tied up by Kalûnga (the supreme being) for the purpose of life (to exist). This ancient wisdom from the Bakôngo of Central Africa gives us a paradigm that we can use to think about the science of our planet Earth. Our planet contains four major spheres of life – the geosphere (earth), the hydrosphere (water), the atmosphere (air), and the biosphere (life/fire/spirit) which is found embedded in all of the other spheres.  

This 16-week course is the follow-up semester (see fall 2020 semester for previously covered topics) of our full academic year course in African centered Earth Science where we’ll explore n’kîngu môyo mu nza, the principles of life on Earth. We’ll examine the various spheres of the Earth as our ancestors saw them – as interconnected parts of a living organism; a living organism that shares many similarities with us humans. 

Coming Soon…